Tesla owner attempts to “refuel” electric car with gasoline pump… because the global warming crowd consists of absolute morons


Tesla’s electric cars are a status symbol — but unfortunately, that status doesn’t necessarily equate to intelligence. The global warming crowd has been quick to adopt electric vehicles, both for the perceived environmental benefits and the sense of superiority that comes with them. But, electric cars aren’t as “environmentally friendly” as they’re cracked up to be; the process of creating and fueling an electric car may not be any better for the planet than a gas-powered car. And apparently, electric cars are really hard to use for some people.

A video recently shared on Twitter showcases a Tesla owner trying to put gas in her car:

It appears that the video was originally taken by Twitter user Caleb Hull, and was then picked up by Car Crash TV and shared again. The two-minute clip shows a blonde woman driving a Tesla at a gas station. She spends quite some time searching for the car’s fuel door, but of course, there isn’t one.

Not to be deterred, the Tesla driver picks up the fuel pump and simply presses it against the side of the car. Whether she expected a fuel door to suddenly appear, or hoped the car would simply refuel by osmosis remains unclear. But, the Tesla driver eventually determined that she was not going to be getting any gas that day.

Is this what the average Tesla driver looks like? Maybe not — but this is could be a sign the Tesla hype has truly gone too far. The masses are now adopting technology they don’t even understand, simply because the media has told them to. Getting an electric car is what’s “trendy” right now, so people are going out and buying them without so much as a second thought. But there are substantial questions about the perceived environmental benefits of electric cars — even if the propaganda-pushing mainstream media won’t divulge such details.

Are electric cars really green?

Electric cars are touted as being the “green” alternative to gas-powered vehicles. The fossil fuel industry has had an undeniable effect on our planet; land degradation, water pollution and air pollution are just some of the side effects of producing and burning fossil fuels. However, the faults of the fossil fuel industry do not automatically confirm the environmental benefits of electric cars.

As Wired reports:

Devonshire Research Group, an investment firm that specializes in valuing tech companies, dug into the data and concluded that Tesla’s environmental benefits may be more hyped than warranted. Devonshire isn’t saying that Tesla is pulling a Volkswagen, or that its cars are spewing greenhouse gases from invisible tailpipes. It’s arguing that Teslas (and, by extension, all electric vehicles) create pollution and carbon emissions in other ways. Each stage of an EV’s life has environmental impacts, and while they aren’t as obvious as a tailpipe pumping out fumes, that doesn’t make them any less damaging.

While electric cars may not use gas, where they get their electricity from is integral to the overall “greenness” of the car. This is especially true if you live in an area where coal-fired power plants are the norm. Experts say your electric car probably isn’t going to perform much better than a gas-powered car in terms of emissions if that’s the case.

More importantly, the actual production of electric cars requires quite a bit of damage to the environment. Tesla and other electric vehicle manufacturers typically rely on lithium and an assortment of rare metals to make the cars’ batteries and other parts. These metals typically come from environmentally destructive mines, are procured through less-than-green means and are processed with a litany of toxic chemicals. At some mines, 99.8 percent of what is dug up ends up getting dumped back into the environment — after its been contaminated with toxins and processing agents. What happens to the battery after the car dies is another problem that the electric car industry has yet to solve.

Green cars are a great concept, but electric cars currently leave much to be desired. See more coverage of the latest tech snafus at Glitch.news or find more hilarious stories of real-world humor at ROFL.news.

Sources for this article include:

TheBurningPlatform.com

Wired.com

NRDC.org

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